What do Maine Coon Cats look like?- And what do you have to know about them

What are the characteristics of the Maine Coon Cats?

Where did they come from? Whats their History?

Lovely Maine coon Cat!

Lovely Maine coon Cat!

That’s an easy question and a lot of reasurch to answer!

Here is some of what I found while reaserching about it!
he Maine Coon is a breed of domestic cat well known for its distinctive physical appearance. It is one of the oldest natural breeds in North America, specifically native to the state of Maine, where it is the official State Cat.
Although the Maine Coon’s exact origins and date of introduction to the United States are unknown, many theories have been proposed. The breed was popular in cat shows in the late 1800s, but its existence became threatened when long-haired breeds from overseas were introduced in the early 20th century. The Maine Coon has since made a comeback and is now the second most popular cat breed in the world, according to the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA).
The Maine Coon is generally noted for its large bone structure, its rectangular body shape, and a long, flowing coat. The breed can be seen in a variety of colors and are known for their intelligence and gentle personalities. Health problems, such as feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hip dysplasia, are seen in the breed, but testing is available to detect the genes responsible for causing these abnormalities.

The ancestral origins of the Maine Coon are unknown. There are only theories and folktales. One such folktale involves Marie Antoinette, the Queen of France, who was executed in 1793. Before her death, Antoinette attempted to escape France with the help of Captain Samuel Clough. She loaded Clough’s ship with her most prized possessions, including six of her favorite long-haired cats. Although Antoinette did not make it to the United States, her pets safely reached the shores of Wiscasset, Maine, where they mated with short-haired breeds and evolved into the modern breed of the Maine Coon.

The Maine Coon is a breed of the domestic cats and one of the oldest natural breeds in North America, escpecialy in the state of Maine.
Since the date of the arriving of the Maine Coon cat to the states is unknown, many theories have been made. (See below!)

The breed used to be popular in cat shows in the late 1800s, but popularity for cat shows became threatened when long-haired breeds from overseas were brought to America in the early 20th century.
Such as the Persian Cat and other.

Since then, the Maine Coon has become popular once more and is now the second most popular and loved cat breed in the world, according to the Cat Fanciers’ Association.
The Maine Coon generally has a large bone structure,and a rectangular body shape, a long, flowing coat and lovely long hair! They can be in a variety of colors and are known for their intelligence and gentle personalities!

(I love this Cat!!!!)
Maine Coons are also known as the “gentle giants” and possess above-average intelligence, making them relatively easy to train.
They are known for being loyal to their family and cautious around strangers. They are independent and not clingy.
The Maine Coon is generally not known for being a “lap cat” but their gentle characteristic behavior makes the breed relaxed around dogs, other cats, and children.
They are playful throughout their hall lives, with males tending to have more clownish behavior and females generally possessing more dignity.
Many Maine Coons love the water and some poeple think that this comes from their ancestors, who were aboard ships for much of their lives.
Maine Coons are known for their kindness, but some are very shy and do not like being around people.

The fairytale of how Maine Coons came to America!

As to the ancestral origins of the Maine Coon Cats they are unknown! There for there are only theories and folktales. One such folktale involves Marie Antoinette, the Queen of France, who was executed in 1793. Before her death, Antoinette attempted to escape France with the help of Captain Samuel Clough. She loaded Clough’s ship with her most prized possessions, including six of her favorite long-haired cats.
Although Antoinette did not make it to the United States, her pets safely reached the shores of Wiscasset, Maine, where they mated with short-haired breeds and evolved into the modern breed of the Maine Coon.

Another folktale involves Captain Charles Coon, an English seafarer who kept long-haired cats aboard his ships.
They sat abroad the deck looking at the see and even where found in the sailors cabins! They where every where!

And whenever Captain Coon’s ship would anchor in the New England ports (so called America), the felines would happily leap of the ship and mate with the local cats!
When long-haired kittens began appearing in the litters of the local cat population, they were referred to as one of “Coon’s cats”.
And The ones in Maine, as Maine Coons!
A theory which is biologically-based, though genetically impossible, is the idea that the modern Maine Coon descended from ancestors of semi-feral domestic cats and raccoons.
This could have possibly explained the most common color of the breed (brown tabby) and the bushy tail, which is a characteristic trait.
Another idea is that the Maine Coon originated between the matings of domestic cats and wild bobcats, which could explain the tufts of hairs that are so commonly seen on the tips of the ears.
There’ve been reports and sightings of domestic cats breeding with bobcats.
The generally-accepted theory among breeders is, that the Maine Coon Cats are descended from the pairings of local short-haired cats and long-haired breeds brought overseas by English seafarers (possibly by Captain Charles Coon) or 11th-century Vikings.
The connection to the Vikings is seen in the strong resemblance of the Maine Coon to the Norwegian Forest Cat, another breed which is said to be a descendant of cats that traveled with the Vikings.
So wich Theory do YOU think is more likely? Tell us!”

Maine Coon Cat is the perfect Snow Machine! Hard survival in Cold Winters is no problem for them!

Maine Coons have several great adaptations to survive in harsh and cold winter climates.
Their dense water-resistant fur is longer and shaggier on their underside and rear for extra much protection when they are on top of wet surfaces and cold snow.
Their long and bushy raccoon-like tail is resistant to sinking in snow, and can be curled around their face and shoulders, like a scarf, for warmth and protection from wind and blowing snow.
“Isn’t that amazing?! We can’t do that!”

Large paws, and especially the extra-large paws of Polydactyl** Maine Coons, make walking on snow an easy task and are often compared to human snowshoes.
Long tufts of fur growing between their toes help keep their toes warm and aid walking on snow, by giving the paws additional structure without much extra weight.
The Maine Coon cats have heavily furred ears with extra long tufts of fur growing from inside of their ears to help keep their ears nice and warm.

They don’t get ear infections in the cold!
**Many of the original Maine Coon cats that live in the New England area, posse a trait known as polydactylism (having one or more extra toes on the feet).
This trait is thought to have happened in about 40% of all the Maine Coon Cats in Maine at one time, but there is no evidence.

Polydactylism is hardyl ever, if at all, seen in Maine Coons in the shows, since it is unacceptable by competition standards.
The gene for polydactylism is a simple autosomal dominant gene, which poses no threat to the cat’s health.
The trait was almost distinct from the breed, because of the fact that it was a not allowered in show rings and all cats with it would be discalified automaticly!
There for, private organizations and breeders were set up to keep polydactylism in Maine Coons from vanishing.

Health issues:

There are hunderets, if not thausands of Cat-Health issues, of wich the Maine Coon cats can only possibly have 4. See lower down…
Yet of course as life is, most probably your cat won’t have it!
Even though there are millions of human desease we don’t always catch them, or get to be born with them! The same is with cats!….

An all-white Maine Coon – healthy or not?

Maine Coons are generally a healthy and hardy breed and have evolved to survive the New England climate.
The most severe threat is feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common heart disease seen in cats, that is genetically inherited in some breeds.
In Maine Coons, it is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Middle-aged to older cats, and males are predisposed to the disease.
HCM is a progressive disease and can cause heart failure, paralysis of the back legs due to clot embolization originating in the heart, and sudden death.
A specific mutation that causes HCM is seen in Maine Coons for which testing services are offered. Of all the Maine Coons tested for the MyBPC mutation at the Veterinary Cardiac Genetics Lab at the College of Veterinary Medicine located at Washington State University, approximately only one-third tested to have it.

A female tabby Maine Coon – possible health issues

1.A potential health problem in the maine coon is spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), another genetically inherited disease which causes the loss of the neurons in the spinal cord that activate the skeletal muscles of the trunk and limbs. Symptoms are normally seen within 3–4 months of age and result in muscle atrophy, muscle weakness, and a shortened life span. A test is offered to detect the genes responsible for SMA.
2.Hip dysplasia is an abnormality of the hip joint that can cause crippling lameness and arthritis. This dessise can be seen in Maine Coons. In a research survey finalized by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) in 2007, they disscovered that the Maine Coons are the only Cat breed (“understanding through context.”) that can have this missformation!
3.Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a slowly progressive disease that is possible among Maine Coons, though it was thought only to plague the Persian and Persian-related breeds. Symptoms typically show around seven years of age and the effects are incurable.

PKD generally leads to renal failure and is genetically inherited, so careful screening and testing are the only ways to prevent this disease from occurring.

But mostly they are healthy, happy and fine!!!

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4 Comments on “What do Maine Coon Cats look like?- And what do you have to know about them”

  1. Bianca Says:

    Hi, I would to know how well this breed would do in the harsh South African climates, I would like to get my self one. Thank you.

  2. Linda Says:

    Hi – I have a Maine Coon also – he is 20 pounds and looks like (almost identically) this big orange & white guy. “Mister Lucky” was rescued by me when my next door neighbors moved away without him. Their Loss! Mister Lucky is beautiful, loveable, independent and intelligent. He is also incredibably hilarious with a distinct personality. Loves dogs and is the guardian of my littler (8 lb.) rescue kitty Roxie. I love my big boy – he’s awesome!


  3. @Bianca
    Hi Bianca,
    I am not an Expert breeder, I think you should ask a breeder in your area or some specialist. I personally don’t think that it would be a very wise thing to start breeding Maine Coon cats in South Africa, it would be very, VERY hot for them, more than for short haired cats. For as you can see; maine coon cat is a VERY hairy cat made for the cold climates and snowy mountains and not for the hot hot HOT climate of South Africa.
    Just think of the poor cat!
    How it will sweat and be miserable (unless you are planning to shave it all off which is also not a very nice thing to do)

  4. maine coon Says:

    I like your post. And i would like to recommend one of maine coon cattery. Here are maine coon kittens for sale. Those kittens are very pretty and have a champion genes. One of the prettiest kitten for me are “Dacota Blue” but now it reserved…


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